Front Resolving Observational Network with Telemetry

Lead PI: Dr. James O’Donnell, University of Connecticut

The partnership will develop, demonstrate, and evaluate an easily deployed, cost effective observation and prediction system for the coastal ocean. A diverse range of real-time physical and biological measurements will be combined with dynamical and biological modeling. The data assimilative approach to ocean observation mitigates the impact of sampling inadequacies by requiring dynamical consistency of the data. It will also allow forecasting.

Data telemetry and instrument control will be accomplished with an underwater acoustic communication network. The network features multiple inexpensive acoustic modems connected in a topology that can tolerate failure or loss of individual elements. Performance of the observation system will be evaluated by comparing assimilated data products to results from cruises with intense sampling designed to resolve multiple scales of variability.

For more information on this project, click here.

Number of Years: 3

Partners:

  • University of Connecticut – Project coordination; data assimilation and inverse modeling; autonomous, trawl-resistant, bottom-mounted instrument array; high-frequency radar measurement of surface currents; large scale surveys; frontal scale circulation and hydrography; educational outreach
  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology – Data assimilation and inverse modeling
  • University of Rhode Island – High-frequency radar measurement of surface currents; satellite temperature (AVHRR) and color (SeaWiFS); large scale surveys; frontal scale turbulence survey
  • Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
  • Biological Oceanography – Profiling plankton observatory
  • Physical Oceanography – Data assimilation and inverse modeling
  • CODAR Ocean Sensors, Ltd. – High-frequency radar measurement of surface currents
  • Datasonics, Inc. – Bottom-mounted acoustic communications network
  • Naval Undersea Warfare Center – Frontal scale turbulence survey
  • Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center, San Diego – Bottom-mounted acoustic communications network
  • United States Coast Guard – Lagrangian drifter program

FY 2002 PI Report

Additional Reports:
FY 2002 Rice


 


A Consortium for Ocean Circulation and Climate Estimation

Lead PI: Dr. Detlef Stammer, Scripps Institution of Oceanography

The partnership will develop a five-year NOPP A2 (Phase B) “node” to bring ocean state estimation from its current experimental status to a practical and quasi-operational tool for studying large-scale ocean dynamics, for examining the ocean’s role in climate variability, and for quantitatively designing long-term observational strategies. The central technical goal is a complete global-scale ocean state estimation over at least the 15 year period 1985-2000 at 1/4 resolution with a complete error description and regional refinements to support CLIVAR and GODAE needs. The partnership will combine all available and anticipated large-scale data sets – including TOPEX/POSEIDON, TOGA-TAO, high-resolution VOS XBT/XCTD, profiling floats, and drifters – with the dynamics embodied in a general circulation model to estimate the time-evolving, three-dimensional physical state of the full oceanic circulation. Results will be evaluated by the consortium in collaboration with the community and made available to all, fostered through an educational and visitor program.

Number of Years: 5

Partners:

  • Scripps Institution of Oceanography – Global optimization computation: implementation of model developments into optimization; use of the global results for studies of oceanic variability, global observation system design; upper-ocean model-data and estimation of data and error co-variance; Pacific Basin-wide Extended Climate Studies (BECS) model
  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology – Model development; use of global model for study of heat, salt, carbon budgets; regional observing system design; regional Atlantic BECS model
  • Jet Propulsion Laboratory – Global optimization computation; reduced Kalman filter/smoother; Pacific BECS model and regional optimization; operational products; maintenance of data and model output flow both internally and to outside users

FY 2002 PI Report
FY 2004 PI Report

Additional Reports:
FY 2002 Marshall
FY 2003 Fukumori


Real-Time Forecasting System of Winds, Waves and Surge in Tropical Cyclones

Lead PI: Dr. Hans C. Graber, University of Miami, RSMAS

The long-term goal of this partnership is to establish an operational forecasting system of the wind field and resulting waves and surge impacting the coastline during the approach and landfall of tropical cyclones. The results of this forecasting system will provide real-time information to the National Hurricane Center during the tropical cyclone season in the Atlantic for establishing improved advisories for the general public and federal agencies including military and civil emergency response teams. The feasibility of such a forecast system has been established over the past decade from the development of the individual modules. These modules have independently been tested over the years and are now ready to be linked into a complete forecasting system. This project will conduct planning activities for the functional description of the forecasting system, establish the acquisition of data sources, determine the computing requirements, design the interfaces, and define model output products.

Number of Years: 1

Partners:

  • University of Miami/Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science – Real-time forecasting system; test case: Hurricane Georges
  • Florida Atlantic University – Real-time forecasting system; test case: Hurricane Georges
  • Oceanweather, Inc. – Real-time forecasting system; test case: Hurricane Georges
  • Sun Microsystems, Inc. – Test case: Hurricane Georges; assessment
  • US Army Corps of Engineers – Real-time forecasting system; test case: Hurricane Georges
  • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
  • Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory – Real-time forecasting system; test case: Hurricane Georges
  • National Hurricane Center – Real-time forecasting system; assessment

Models of the Coastal Ocean off the West Coast of North America: A Comparative Study and Synthesis of Observations

Lead PI: Dr. Thomas Powell, University of California, Berkeley

The partnership will conduct a year-long planning activity to develop a concrete, detailed work-plan that will concentrate and strengthen modeling and data assimilation off the Pacific coast of North America. The overall goal of the partnership is to develop a coherent and comprehensive picture of the ocean processes in this coastal region of the eastern Pacific. Moreover, the techniques of data assimilation are becoming sufficiently well-developed that a synthesis of data and models is within reach of investigators.

Number of Years: 1

Partners:

  • University of California, Berkeley – Overall leadership; meeting organization and logistics (travel arrangements); work-plan and final NOPP proposal preparation (lead role); aid to small computer users (e.g. front end to “hub” connections)
  • University of California, Los Angeles – Overall leadership; meeting organization; work-plan and final NOPP proposal preparation; computing support, especially devoted to remote computing at large facilities (e.g. accounts, evaluation of procedures, etc.); preparation of report on “hub” emulation experiences
  • Oregon State University – Overall leadership; meeting organization; work-plan and final NOPP proposal preparation
  • Naval Postgraduate School – Meeting and task-group participation, including computational projects, as appropriate; work-plan and NOPP proposal preparation
  • Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey¬†– Meeting and task-group participation, including computational projects, as appropriate; work-plan and NOPP proposal preparation
  • Scripps Institution of Oceanography – Meeting and task-group participation, including computational projects, as appropriate; work-plan and NOPP proposal preparation
  • Jet Propulsion Laboratory – Meeting and task-group participation, including computational projects, as appropriate; work-plan and NOPP proposal preparation
  • Naval Research Laboratory – Meeting and task-group participation, including computational projects, as appropriate; work-plan and NOPP proposal preparation
  • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Pacific Fisheries Environmental Group – Meeting and task-group participation, including computational projects, as appropriate; work-plan and NOPP proposal preparation
  • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory – Meeting and task-group participation, including computational projects, as appropriate; work-plan and NOPP proposal preparation
  • Institute of Ocean Sciences – Meeting and task-group participation, including computational projects, as appropriate; work-plan and NOPP proposal preparation
  • National Center for Atmospheric Research – Meeting and task-group participation, including computational projects, as appropriate; work-plan and NOPP proposal preparation

An Integrated System for Real-Time CTD Profiling Float Data on Basin Scales (ARGO)

Lead PI: Dr. Dean H. Roemmich, Scripps Institution of Oceanography

The partnership will, using profiling float technology, provide the oceanographic and climate science communities with the capability to obtain systematic real-time information of the physical state of the ocean. The necessary steps for putting this capability in place are:

  • Implementation of recent instrumentation developments to improve the performance and cost effectiveness of the instrument.
  • Building a data system that fully integrates data collection, data assembly, quality control and user-based functions.
  • Deploying prototype large-scale arrays in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, within the scientific context of CLIVAR, to demonstrate the ability to provide real-time and delayed mode data streams of high scientific value.

These initial steps target measurements of physical variables, but the global network toward which the long-term effort is aimed can provide the necessary platforms for variety of complementary and compatible chemical and biological sensors.

Number of Years: 3

Partners:

  • Scripps Institution of Oceanography – Project coordinator; instrument development; float fabrication and deployment; data quality, analysis
  • Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution – Instrument development; float fabrication and deployment; data quality, analysis
  • University of Washington – Instrument checkout and deployment; data quality, analysis
  • Seascan, Inc – Instrument development
  • Webb Research Corporation – Instrument development, fabrication
  • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory – Data system coordinator; data tracking; data quality, analysis
  • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory – Data quality, analysis

For more information on Argo, go to www.argo.ucsd.edu.

FY 2002 PI Report
FY 2003 PI Report 
FY 2004 PI Report
FY 2005 PI Report